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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
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cain in ohio, and came within two points. the technology included the so-called system, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure we targeted people to get to the polls. that imploded. i'm told on election day, actually, so many hits from around the country as it should have saying, gee, this person voted, this person didn't, target calls, thought it was under attack, and closed down. for those of you here from, again, the technology field with the politics, we, republicans, want to talk to you. [laughter] we need help. the democrat system is calledded gordon, it was effective at microtargetting, and i heard a lot of antedotes, and you'll love somebody gets a call who is a democrat in law school, and it was gee, you know, we see that you have voted, this information is public available. we see you voted at two o'clock on election day, but your sister, at two lane, has not voted, could you call her? that's the level at which they were dealing, whereas, you know, we were flying blind at that point. part of it is technology, and part of a turnout that was imp
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
american nation, the congress especially, has caved into this military worship of technology. i've seen that in the last 20 years grow. in the '90s and 2000s, we seem to give a pass always to the military. >> since i get over here about the military, it's almost impossible to criticize anyone in the military because there's such patriotism towards it, and i get that, but it is particularly pronounced in america, it is almost seen as utter disloyalty, if not treachery, to criticize any military man or woman. that's dangerous, isn't it? >> it leads back to rome. go back to the roman empire. the pretorian guard. emperors would pay homage and favors and pay them more money to be loyal to that faction. eventually, the roman guards, military, became more important than the citizenry. of course, they didn't hold up the empire. they are all over the place but they couldn't hold back the barbarians and so forth. it doesn't work. you don't bribe the military. and, frankly, we could be in a position where things get more chaotic and there could be another terrorist attack and this concept of ameri
is julian sanchez, a senior research fellow covering technology, privacy, and civil liberties. jeremy, once again, a reminder that even though you hit the delete button, it doesn't disappear completely, does it? >> everything can be tracked, traced, monitored and recovered. if you have something really important or private, either say it in person, put it on a piece of paper, burn the piece of paper, nothing is private anymore. >> even a draft? you didn't even send the draft. >> there are two kind of people that use this technique. it's teenagers and people who read "the girl with the dragon tattoo." this is a pretty well-known technique. it isn't super secret. it's more than what you'd expect from the average person to do, but if somebody wants it get into a g-mail account, the most e-mailed article last week in "the new york times" was how to protect your password. people are just getting a feel for out insecure their online e-mail accounts are, but they're very vulnerable. >> so they're figuring out your password. >> julian, you're troubled this investigation began to begin with. it did
of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. oral-b power brushes. ♪♪ you can help othersnk along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> i am harris falkner, this is the fox report. time for the top of the news, breaking new details on the scandal that brought the career of general petraeus to an abrupt end. we are learning more and how it uncovered the relationship. officials sending harassing e-mails were sent to a woman named jill kelly. that is jill kelly second from the right in the photo sending right next to the general's wife holly. kelly was a family friend of the petraeus's. she got the e-mails she complained to federal investiga
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
in the development of state of the art oil spill prevention and response technologies, education research and training. and more than $1 billion will go to the united states coast guard trust fund to be available for clean up and compensation for those affected by oil spills in the gulf and throughout the united states. now as part of its guilty plea b.p. will retain a monitor for four years who will oversee safety and maintenance in regard to drilling in the gulf as well as an independent auditor who will conduct annual reviews to ensure compliance with the terms of this agreement. the company will hire an ethics monitor to improve it's its conduct and foster robust cooperation with the government. now there can be no question that this historic announcement is a critical step forward and under scores the justice determination to stand with gulf coast communities. in february the settlement tote ling $90 million related to the company's clean water act liability for the deep water horizon disaster. and approximately $45 million of this total will go directly to the gulf in the form of pe
, driverless cars may be the thing of the future, but one car apparently could not wait for the new technology to evolve. >> take a look at this bizarre scene in wildwood, new jersey. the car keeps going in circles. backward with no one at all behind the wheel. after standing by helplessly, a hero emerges believed to be the fire chief jumping in from the passenger's side window. >> looks like the "dukes of hazard" car. little bit. lots of cheers from the crowd. it all started when drivers and passengers decided to switch side. as both men got out, the car slipped into reverse. >> well done. coming up next, the champagne blues. >> france's bubbly is going flat. we're going to tell you why and what it means for your new year's toast right after this. it's all coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather, brought to you by lifestyle lift. hd3 >>> well, the new halo 4 game is proving to be an angel for microsoft. the sci-fi shoot-'em-up action game raked in $220 million sales globally last tuesday, the first day of sale. >> that beats the record set by previous installment
with technology, to keep up with equipment, to get the latest, to make sure that there itheir infrastructure is in place to serve the country. >> that's why i like it's a class action lawsuit instead of independent complaints. those happen as we know all the time. but a class action like this will get major media attention, will get us all talking about it, and if they prevail i'm hoping that other utility companies around the country will say, you know, we probably don't want to have the same thing happen to us as what happened on long island, let's make sure we do something right. rick: class action lawsuits play an important role in the legal system. don't they usually result in a big payday for the lawyers and not necessarily for the people who sign onto it? >> it's a two-step process. yes they've got to be certified as a class action. they have to make sure everybody is in the same class. i don't think there is a problem there you have everybody on long island suffering from the same thing. you're right, will the lawyer win 30, 40%, yes, okay, that is not great, but let me explain a cla
poorly on the president? >> i'm afraid i blame everything on technology. i don't think this is an unusual thing to happen. it's just that we have a complete electronic trail. i think for thousands of years you've had adultery and all these things. >> brian: you're talk being the actual act. i'm talking about the president knowing. >> i'm also saying i don't think the president would know. you wouldn't have the f.b.i. investigating the c.i.a. if you didn't have all this electronic trail to follow. i don't think you would have all that. >> brian: but this is something that results in some type of blackmail in. >> yes. >> brian: that's the -- >> that's the problem. you have peter king, chairman of the homeland security committee in the house suggesting that perhaps general petraeus' testimony to them was compromised, briefing was compromised. >> brian: because that testimony included? >> the cover-up line about benghazi, which is that this was somehow part of a massive mob stimulated by the -- >> brian: a democrat said this hit me like a lightning bolt. they should have been briefed. >> we k
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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